Thursday, November 22, 2012

Collard Greens and Turkey Neck Bones with Pot Liquor! Soul Food!








Soul Food!

     This year I did a different kind of bunch of recipes for Thanksgiving.  I posted country food, southern food and soul food recipes.  While many other food writers battled it out over chumpy boring cranberry sauce recipes and spending hours on photoshop to make their photo food look glossy, I simply cooked some good old fashioned down home food.  
     While writing the recipes, I noticed that my old soul food recipes were getting over 500 views apiece during the day.  Why?  You tell me!  Its great food.  People want old fashioned good home cooking this time of year, because it provides a level of comfort and nutrition like no other food can.  
     No matter what the high falutin politicians say, the economy sucks and companies are taking advantage of the situation by driving wages down.  Hiring practices are immoral these days.  We are living in bad economic times and with bad economic times comes poor folk food.  Poor folk food, southern country style food and soul food can provide warmth and comfort that no elegant rich folks meal can.  Which class of people ends up eating the healthier food and who becomes stronger in mind, body and spirit, during bad economic times?  The simple down home poor folk!
     There are plenty of recipes for turkey necks and greens on the internet.  Plenty of those recipes qualify as soul food, because they are cooked with heart and soul.  Readers like my authentic soul food, so it does not hurt to add one more good collard greens and turkey neck bone recipe to the list.  Especially on Thanksgiving! 

     This recipe makes 1 portion!

     Turkey Neck Bones:
     Select 12 to 14 ounces of turkey neck bones.
     Use a sharp butchers cleaver to cut the turkey necks into about 2" long pieces.
     Set the turkey neck pieces aside.

     Collard Greens:
     Select 1 bunch of good crisp collard green.
     Soak the collard greens in cold water and rinse the greens clean.
     Shake the water off of the collard greens.
     Place each leaf on a cutting board with the vein side facing up.
     Use a sharp knife to shave the thick veins, so they become thinner and cook tender.
     Cut the leaves into 6" wide pieces.
     Set the collard greens aside.

     Collard Greens and Turkey Neck Bones with Pot Liquor: 
     Heat a wide pot over medium heat.
     Add 2 tablespoons of pork lard.  (Home made rendered pork lard is best.  Many Mexican markets sell hand crafted small batch white pork lard or roasted pork lard.)
     Add the turkey neck pieces.
     Saute the turkey necks, till brown highlights appear on all sides.
     Add 1/4 cup of small chopped onion.
     Add 1 small chopped green onion.
     Add 1 small chopped green jalapeno pepper.
     Saute till the onions start to get some light brown highlights.
     Add enough light chicken broth or light pork broth to cover the ingredients.
     Add 1 pinch of garlic powder.
     Add sea salt and black pepper.
     Add 1/2 tablespoon of white vinegar or cider vinegar.
     Bring the liquid to a gentle boil.
     Reduce the temperature to low heat.
     Cover the pot with a loose fitting lid.
     Gently simmer the ingredients, till the collard greens start to become tender. 
     Remove the lid from the pot.
     Raise the temperature to medium/medium low heat.
     Simmer and reduce the liquid, till about 1/2 cup of liquid remains in the pot.  (The reduced liquid is the pot liquor!  By this time, the pepper and onions should be cooked to just about a mush and they should now almost all become part of the pot liquor.)
     
     Collard Greens and Turkey Neck Bones with Pot Liquor Presentation:
     Place a bed of the collard greens around the border of a shallow stew bowl.
     Place the turkey neck bones in the center of the bowl.
     Pour the rich pot liquor and any remaining vegetables over the turkey necks.

     Good tasting old fashioned southern comfort food like you never had.  Soul Food!  Yum!  ...  Shawna    

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